Clackamas Community College

English Literature (ENG)

ENG-104  Introduction to Literature: Fiction  
4 credits, Summer/Fall  

An introduction to American and international short stories, with a focus on the fundamental elements of fiction. Also examines the historical, social, and cultural background and significance of fiction. Students engage in literary analysis, use literary terminology, and develop personal and scholarly responses to fiction.

Recommended: WRD-098 or placement in WR-121  
ENG-105  Introduction to Literature: Drama  
4 credits, Winter  

An introduction to American and international drama, emphasizing reading, appreciation, discussion, and literary analysis. Focuses on defining the genre and elements of drama, encouraging students' personal reflections and cultural understanding, incorporating relevant literary theories, and practicing the close reading and analysis of dramatic works.

Recommended: WRD-098 or placement in WR-121  
ENG-106  Introduction to Literature: Poetry  
4 credits, Spring/Summer  

An introduction to multicultural poetry in English and translation. Explores the elements of poetry and examines the historical, social, and cultural significance of various poems. Students engage in literary analysis, use literary terminology, and develop both personal and analytical responses to poetry.

Recommended: WRD-098 or placement in WR-121  
ENG-107  World Literature: Ancient Through Classical Times  
4 credits, Fall  

Literature of the ancient through classical worlds: epic, lyric, and dramatic literature. Through class discussion, research, and written work, students practice close reading and literary interpretation, explore the readings' contemporary relevance, relate the readings to their own lives and the world, and engage in academic conversations about the literature.

Recommended: WRD-098 or placement in WR-121  
ENG-108  World Literature: Early Middle Ages through the 18th Century  
4 credits, Winter  

Literature of the Early Middle Ages through the 18th Century, in a variety of genres. Through class discussion, research, and written work, students practice close reading and literary interpretation, explore the readings' contemporary relevance, relate the readings to their own lives and the world, and engage in academic conversations about the literature.

Recommended: WRD-098 or placement in WR-121  
ENG-109  World Literature: The 19th through 21st Centuries  
4 credits, Spring  

Literature of the 19th through 21st centuries, in a variety of genres. Through class discussion, research, and written work, students practice close reading and literary interpretation, explore the readings' contemporary relevance, relate the readings to their own lives and the world, and engage in academic conversations about the literature.

Recommended: WRD-098 or placement in WR-121  
ENG-116  Introduction to Literature: Comics  
4 credits, Fall/Winter  

Examines the intrinsic literary and artistic qualities of comics, as well as their connections to classic literature, and the literature and other art they have inspired.

Recommended: WRD-098 or placement in WR-121  
ENG-121  Mystery Fiction  
4 credits, Fall  

An introduction to detective/mystery fiction. Students will read, discuss, and analyze short stories by writers such as Edgar Allan Poe, Agatha Christie, and Walter Mosley.

Recommended: WRD-098 or placement in WR-121  
ENG-130  Leadership in Literature  
4 credits, Not Offered Every Year  

Examines the nature of leadership by analyzing characters in major literary works.

Recommended: WRD-098 or placement in WR-121  
ENG-194  Introduction to Film  
4 credits, Not Offered Every Year  

Viewing, discussion, and analysis of films from a variety of eras and cultures. Students will learn to analyze a film beyond its surface meaning, drawing on film aesthetics, technology, history, and theory. The interpretive and critical thinking skills they develop can be applied to a variety of modern media.

Recommended: WRD-098 or placement in WR-121  
ENG-195  American Film  
4 credits, Winter  

This course will focus on the history and theory of American filmmaking from 1895 to the present. Film will be viewed as a visual language and an evolving art form that expresses and influences American culture.

Recommended: WRD-098 or placement in WR-121  
ENG-201  Shakespeare  
4 credits, Fall  

Selected comedies, histories, tragedies, romances, and poetry. Students focus on reading and discussion, literary interpretation, and relating Shakespeare's work to their lives and the world. Works from ENG-201 will not be repeated in CCC's other Shakespeare course, ENG-202.

Recommended: WRD-098 or placement in WR-121  
ENG-202  Shakespeare  
4 credits, Winter  

Selected comedies, histories, tragedies, romances, and poetry. Students focus on reading and discussion, literary interpretation, and relating Shakespeare's work to their lives and the world. Study of significant plays and sonnets. Works from ENG-202 will not be repeated in CCC's other Shakespeare course, ENG-201.

Recommended: WRD-098 or placement in WR-121  
ENG-204  British Literature: Ancient to Enlightenment  
4 credits, Fall  

Representative study of British literature, including major works, writers, and literary forms, from its beginnings through the eighteenth century. Readings from the Anglo-Saxon, Middle English, Renaissance, Restoration, and Enlightenment periods.

Recommended: WRD-098 or placement in WR-121  
ENG-205  British Literature: Romantic to Contemporary  
4 credits, Winter  

Representative study of British literature, including major works, writers, and literary forms. Nineteenth century through modern, with readings from the Romantic, Victorian, and modern periods.

Recommended: WRD-098 or placement in WR-121  
ENG-213  U.S. Latino Literature  
4 credits, Not Offered Every Year  

Survey of U.S. Latino/a literature of various genres and historical periods. Literary contributions by writers of varied cultural heritage, including Chicano, Cuban-American, Puerto-Rican and more.

Prerequisites: WRD-098 or placement in WR-121  
ENG-218  Arthurian Literature  
4 credits, Not Offered Every Year  

Origins and development of Arthurian literature from medieval to modern times. Examines topics such as knighthood, chivalry, the hero's quest, abduction and adultery, courtly love, the Round Table.

Prerequisites: WRD-098 or placement in WR-121  
ENG-225  Creative Nonfiction Literature  
4 credits, Not Offered Every Year  

Discussion and analysis of various types of creative nonfiction such as literary journalism, memoirs, nature or science writing, literary travel writing, and personal essays.

Prerequisites: WRD-098 or placement in WR-121  
ENG-226  Popular Literature  
4 credits, Fall/Spring  

Focuses on genre work within prose, film, comics and/or videogames that is specific in theme and targeted towards a more mass audience than traditional literary work. Genres might include but not necessarily be limited to horror, fantasy, science fiction, romance, and/or westerns. May be repeated for up to 8 credits.

Recommended: WRD-098 or placement in WR-121  
ENG-230  Documentary Film  
4 credits, Not Offered Every Term  

This course will focus on documentary film history and theory. Students will learn to analyze documentary film and appreciate its value as a mode of cultural expression and influence.

Recommended: WRD-098 or placement in WR-121  
ENG-240  Native American Mythology  
4 credits, Not Offered Every Year  

Explores Native American mythology and its cultural, social, and literary significance; views Native American mythology in its historical and geographic positions and in the larger context of world literary tradition; considers how studying myth affects and influences reading other works; introduces theoretical approaches to mythology and basic literary elements and terminology.

Recommended: WRD-098 or placement in WR-121  
ENG-241  Norse Mythology  
4 credits, Not Offered Every Year  

Explores Norse mythology and its cultural, social, and literary significance; views Norse mythology in its historical and geographic positions and in the larger context of Western literary traditions; introduces theoretical approaches to mythology and basic literary elements and terminology; considers how studying myth affects and influences reading other works; connects Norse myth to medieval European and modern fantasy literature.

Recommended: WRD-098 or placement in WR-121  
ENG-250  Greek Mythology  
4 credits, Not Offered Every Term  

Explores the historical, cultural, social, and literary significance of Greek myths; views Greek mythology in its historical and geographic positions and in the larger context of Western civilization and literary tradition; considers how studying myth affects and influences reading other works; introduces theoretical approaches to mythology and basic literary elements and terminology.

Recommended: WRD-098 or placement in WR-121  
ENG-251  Celtic Mythology  
4 credits, Not Offered Every Year  

Explores the historical, cultural, social, and literary significance of Celtic myths; views Celtic mythology in its historical and geographic positions and in the larger context of Western civilization and literary tradition; considers how studying myth affects and influences reading other works; introduces theoretical approaches to mythology and basic literary elements and terminology.

Recommended: WRD-098 or placement in WR-121  
ENG-252  Hindu Mythology  
4 credits, Not Offered Every Year  

Explores the historical, cultural, social, and literary significance of Hindu myths; views Hindu mythology in its historical and geographic positions and in the larger context of world civilization and literary tradition; considers how studying myth affects and influences reading other works; introduces theoretical approaches to mythology and basic literary elements and terminology.

Recommended: WRD-098 or placement in WR-121  
ENG-253  American Literature: Pre-Columbian to Civil War  
4 credits, Winter  

Representative readings from pre-European contact to 1865. Surveys the development of American poetry, fiction, drama, and prose through the study of the works of both major and lesser known writers.

Recommended: WRD-098 or placement in WR-121  
ENG-254  American Literature: 1865 to Present  
4 credits, Spring  

Representative readings from the 1865 to present day. Surveys the development of American fiction, nonfiction, poetry, and drama through the study of the works of both major and lesser known writers.

Recommended: WRD-098 or placement in WR-121  
ENG-255  American Literature: Topics in American Literature  
4 credits, Not Offered Every Year  

Focus on selected authors and works of American fiction, poetry, nonfiction, and drama. Theme changes yearly.

Recommended: WRD-098 or placement in WR-121  
ENG-260  Introduction to Women Writers  
4 credits, Not Offered Every Term  

The study of the works (e.g. plays, poems, fiction, new media) created by women writers, both classic and contemporary, with an emphasis on women's evolving social, historical, and economic roles.

Recommended: WRD-098 or placement in WR-121  
ENG-261  Literature of Science Fiction  
4 credits, Not Offered Every Year  

Introduction to the literature of science fiction in print and film, exploring historical and contemporary themes. The course covers a variety of authors and films, and examines the art and function of this genre of fiction.

Recommended: WRD-098 or placement in WR-121  
ENG-266  The Literature of War  
4 credits, Spring  

Fiction, poetry, nonfiction, comics, and other genres dealing with the experience and aftermath of war. Shifting historical and cultural contexts will be paired with innovations in aesthetic responses. Texts may include Homer, Crane, Remarque, Heller, O'Brien, Silko, Satrapi, and Sacco.

Recommended: WRD-098 or placement in WR-121  
ENG-270  Introduction to Literary Criticism  
4 credits, Spring  

Students will closely study famous literary texts through a variety of critical approaches such as structuralism, Feminist criticism, Psychoanalytic criticism, Marxist criticism, and queer theory.

Recommended: WRD-098 or placement in WR-121  
ENG-271  World Literature: Ancient Through Classical Times  
4 credits, Fall  

Literature of the ancient through classical worlds: epic, lyric, and dramatic literature. Through class discussion, research, and written work, students practice close reading and literary interpretation, explore the readings' contemporary relevance, relate the readings to their own lives and the world, and engage in academic conversations about the literature.

Recommended: WRD-098 or placement in WR-121  
ENG-272  World Literature: Early Middle Ages through the 18th Century  
4 credits, Winter  

Literature of the Early Middle Ages through the 18th Century, in a variety of genres. Through class discussion, research, and written work, students practice close reading and literary interpretation, explore the readings' contemporary relevance, relate the readings to their own lives and the world, and engage in academic conversations about the literature.

Recommended: WRD-098 or placement in WR-121  
ENG-273  World Literature: the 19th Through 21st Centuries  
4 credits, Spring  

Literature of the 19th through 21st centuries, in a variety of genres. Through class discussion, research, and written work, students practice close reading and literary interpretation, explore the readings' contemporary relevance, relate the readings to their own lives and the world, and engage in academic conversations about the literature.

Recommended: WRD-098 or placement in WR-121  
ENG-280  English/CWE  
2-6 credits, Fall/Winter/Spring/Summer  

Cooperative work experience. Provides students with on-the-job experience in the field of English studies. Variable Credit: 2-6 credits. Required: Student Petition.

Corequisites: CWE-281  
ENG-295  Revolutionary Film  
4 credits, Not Offered Every Term  

This course focuses on the study of revolutionary styles of filmmaking from around the world that were not only socially transformative, but changed the way movies are made.

Recommended: WRD-098 or placement in WR-121  
ENG-296  Adaptation: Literature Into Film  
4 credits, Not Offered Every Term  

Adaptation: Literature into Film is an exploration into the study of the art of transforming literary texts into films. The course focuses on various literary genres such as the novel, the short story, the play, and the nonfiction event, and analyzes the process of transforming these stories from page to screen, thereby creating a new art form. Note: This is a literature and not a writing class.

Recommended: WRD-098 or placement in WR-121  
ENG-297  A.S. Degree Portfolio  
1 credits, Fall/Winter/Spring/Summer  

This course provides the opportunity for A.S. Degree students to revise, edit, reflect upon, and compile their best work from their various focus areas to meet the outcomes for the program and prepare for transfer to a university.

Required: Students must be in the second year of their course of study, and have the majority of their focus area and transfer requirements complete